Mads Gyrd-Hansen selected recent publications

Hrdinka M, Schlicher L, Dai B, Pinkas DM, Bufton JC, Picaud S, Ward JA, Rogers C, Suebsuwong C, Nikhar S et al. 2018. Small molecule inhibitors reveal an indispensable scaffolding role of RIPK2 in NOD2 signaling. EMBO J, 37 (17), pp. e99372-e99372. | Show Abstract | Read more

RIPK2 mediates inflammatory signaling by the bacteria-sensing receptors NOD1 and NOD2. Kinase inhibitors targeting RIPK2 are a proposed strategy to ameliorate NOD-mediated pathologies. Here, we reveal that RIPK2 kinase activity is dispensable for NOD2 inflammatory signaling and show that RIPK2 inhibitors function instead by antagonizing XIAP-binding and XIAP-mediated ubiquitination of RIPK2. We map the XIAP binding site on RIPK2 to the loop between β2 and β3 of the N-lobe of the kinase, which is in close proximity to the ATP-binding pocket. Through characterization of a new series of ATP pocket-binding RIPK2 inhibitors, we identify the molecular features that determine their inhibition of both the RIPK2-XIAP interaction, and of cellular and in vivoNOD2 signaling. Our study exemplifies how targeting of the ATP-binding pocket in RIPK2 can be exploited to interfere with the RIPK2-XIAP interaction for modulation of NOD signaling.

Prabakaran T, Bodda C, Krapp C, Zhang B-C, Christensen MH, Sun C, Reinert L, Cai Y, Jensen SB, Skouboe MK et al. 2018. Attenuation of cGAS-STING signaling is mediated by a p62/SQSTM1-dependent autophagy pathway activated by TBK1. EMBO J, 37 (8), pp. e97858-e97858. | Citations: 5 (Scopus) | Show Abstract | Read more

Negative regulation of immune pathways is essential to achieve resolution of immune responses and to avoid excess inflammation. DNA stimulates type I IFN expression through the DNA sensor cGAS, the second messenger cGAMP, and the adaptor molecule STING Here, we report that STING degradation following activation of the pathway occurs through autophagy and is mediated by p62/SQSTM1, which is phosphorylated by TBK1 to direct ubiquitinated STING to autophagosomes. Degradation of STING was impaired in p62-deficient cells, which responded with elevated IFN production to foreign DNA and DNA pathogens. In the absence of p62, STING failed to traffic to autophagy-associated vesicles. Thus, DNA sensing induces the cGAS-STING pathway to activate TBK1, which phosphorylates IRF3 to induce IFN expression, but also phosphorylates p62 to stimulate STING degradation and attenuation of the response.

Hrdinka M, Gyrd-Hansen M. 2017. The Met1-Linked Ubiquitin Machinery: Emerging Themes of (De)regulation. Mol Cell, 68 (2), pp. 265-280. | Citations: 6 (Web of Science Lite) | Show Abstract | Read more

The linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex, LUBAC, is the only known mammalian ubiquitin ligase that makes methionine 1 (Met1)-linked polyubiquitin (also referred to as linear ubiquitin). A decade after LUBAC was discovered as a cellular activity of unknown function, there are now many lines of evidence connecting Met1-linked polyubiquitin to NF-κB signaling, cell death, inflammation, immunity, and cancer. We now know that Met1-linked polyubiquitin has potent signaling functions and that its deregulation is connected to disease. Indeed, mutations and deficiencies in several factors involved in conjugation and deconjugation of Met1-linked polyubiquitin have been implicated in immune-related disorders. Here, we discuss current knowledge and recent insights into the role and regulation of Met1-linked polyubiquitin, with an emphasis on the mechanisms controlling the function of LUBAC.

Gyrd-Hansen M. 2017. All roads lead to ubiquitin. Cell Death Differ, 24 (7), pp. 1135-1136. | Citations: 1 (European Pubmed Central) | Read more

Breuer M, Gyrd-Hansen M. 2017. Cell scientist to watch - Mads Gyrd-Hansen. J Cell Sci, 130 (12), pp. 1981-1983. | Show Abstract | Read more

Mads Gyrd-Hansen studied biochemistry at the University of Copenhagen and received his PhD in 2005 under the supervision of Marja Jäättelä at the Danish Cancer Society Research Centre. He then joined the laboratory of Pascal Meier at the Institute of Cancer Research in London to work on the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins. Mads returned to Copenhagen in 2008 to the Biotech Research and Innovation Centre (BRIC) in a senior postdoctoral position with Morten Frödin, and subsequently started his own research group with a career-development fellowship from the Danish Research Councils as part of the laboratory of Niels Mailand at the Novo Nordisk Foundation Centre for Protein Research. In 2013, he joined the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at the University of Oxford, where he is now an associate professor and holder of a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellowship and a Sapere Aude starting grant from the Danish Research Councils. Mads is interested in the non-degradative functions and regulation of ubiquitylation in pro-inflammatory signalling during innate immune responses.This article is part of a Minifocus on Ubiquitin Regulation and Function. For further reading, please see related articles: 'Mechanisms of regulation and diversification of deubiquitylating enzyme function' by Pawel Leznicki and Yogesh Kulathu (J. Cell Sci.130, 1997-2006). 'Exploitation of the host cell ubiquitin machinery by microbial effector' proteins by Yi-Han Lin and Matthias P. Machner (J. Cell Sci.130, 1985-1996).

Fiil BK, Gyrd-Hansen M. 2016. OTULIN deficiency causes auto-inflammatory syndrome. Cell Res, 26 (11), pp. 1176-1177. | Citations: 2 (European Pubmed Central) | Show Abstract | Read more

Ubiquitin chains assembled via the N-terminal methionine (Met1 or linear ubiquitin), conjugated by the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC), participate in NF-κΒ-dependent inflammatory signaling and immune responses. A recent report in Cell finds that OTULIN, a deubiquitinase that selectively cleaves Met1-linked ubiquitin chains, is essential for restraining inflammation in vivo.

Elliott PR, Leske D, Hrdinka M, Bagola K, Fiil BK, McLaughlin SH, Wagstaff J, Volkmar N, Christianson JC, Kessler BM et al. 2016. SPATA2 Links CYLD to LUBAC, Activates CYLD, and Controls LUBAC Signaling. Mol Cell, 63 (6), pp. 990-1005. | Citations: 28 (Scopus) | Show Abstract | Read more

The linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) regulates immune signaling, and its function is regulated by the deubiquitinases OTULIN and CYLD, which associate with the catalytic subunit HOIP. However, the mechanism through which CYLD interacts with HOIP is unclear. We here show that CYLD interacts with HOIP via spermatogenesis-associated protein 2 (SPATA2). SPATA2 interacts with CYLD through its non-canonical PUB domain, which binds the catalytic CYLD USP domain in a CYLD B-box-dependent manner. Significantly, SPATA2 binding activates CYLD-mediated hydrolysis of ubiquitin chains. SPATA2 also harbors a conserved PUB-interacting motif that selectively docks into the HOIP PUB domain. In cells, SPATA2 is recruited to the TNF receptor 1 signaling complex and is required for CYLD recruitment. Loss of SPATA2 increases ubiquitination of LUBAC substrates and results in enhanced NOD2 signaling. Our data reveal SPATA2 as a high-affinity binding partner of CYLD and HOIP, and a regulatory component of LUBAC-mediated NF-κB signaling.

Hrdinka M, Fiil BK, Zucca M, Leske D, Bagola K, Yabal M, Elliott PR, Damgaard RB, Komander D, Jost PJ, Gyrd-Hansen M. 2016. CYLD Limits Lys63- and Met1-Linked Ubiquitin at Receptor Complexes to Regulate Innate Immune Signaling. Cell Rep, 14 (12), pp. 2846-2858. | Citations: 35 (Scopus) | Show Abstract | Read more

Innate immune signaling relies on the deposition of non-degradative polyubiquitin at receptor-signaling complexes, but how these ubiquitin modifications are regulated by deubiquitinases remains incompletely understood. Met1-linked ubiquitin (Met1-Ub) is assembled by the linear ubiquitin assembly complex (LUBAC), and this is counteracted by the Met1-Ub-specific deubiquitinase OTULIN, which binds to the catalytic LUBAC subunit HOIP. In this study, we report that HOIP also interacts with the deubiquitinase CYLD but that CYLD does not regulate ubiquitination of LUBAC components. Instead, CYLD limits extension of Lys63-Ub and Met1-Ub conjugated to RIPK2 to restrict signaling and cytokine production. Accordingly, Met1-Ub and Lys63-Ub were individually required for productive NOD2 signaling. Our study thus suggests that LUBAC, through its associated deubiquitinases, coordinates the deposition of not only Met1-Ub but also Lys63-Ub to ensure an appropriate response to innate immune receptor activation.

Schwerd T, Pandey S, Yang H-T, Bagola K, Jameson E, Jung J, Lachmann RH, Shah N, Patel SY, Booth C et al. 2017. Impaired antibacterial autophagy links granulomatous intestinal inflammation in Niemann-Pick disease type C1 and XIAP deficiency with NOD2 variants in Crohn's disease. Gut, 66 (6), pp. 1060-1073. | Citations: 20 (Scopus) | Show Abstract | Read more

OBJECTIVE: Patients with Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1), a lysosomal lipid storage disorder that causes neurodegeneration and liver damage, can present with IBD, but neither the significance nor the functional mechanism of this association is clear. We studied bacterial handling and antibacterial autophagy in patients with NPC1. DESIGN: We characterised intestinal inflammation in 14 patients with NPC1 who developed IBD. We investigated bacterial handling and cytokine production of NPC1 monocytes or macrophages in vitro and compared NPC1-associated functional defects to those caused by IBD-associated nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) variants or mutations in X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP). RESULTS: Patients with the lysosomal lipid storage disorder NPC1 have increased susceptibility to early-onset fistulising colitis with granuloma formation, reminiscent of Crohn's disease (CD). Mutations in NPC1 cause impaired autophagy due to defective autophagosome function that abolishes NOD2-mediated bacterial handling in vitro similar to variants in NOD2 or XIAP deficiency. In contrast to genetic NOD2 and XIAP variants, NPC1 mutations do not impair NOD2-receptor-interacting kinase 2 (RIPK2)-XIAP-dependent cytokine production. Pharmacological activation of autophagy can rescue bacterial clearance in macrophages in vitro by increasing the autophagic flux and bypassing defects in NPC1. CONCLUSIONS: NPC1 confers increased risk of early-onset severe CD. Our data support the concept that genetic defects at different checkpoints of selective autophagy cause a shared outcome of CD-like immunopathology linking monogenic and polygenic forms of IBD. Muramyl dipeptide-driven cytokine responses and antibacterial autophagy induction are parallel and independent signalling cascades downstream of the NOD2-RIPK2-XIAP complex.

Canning P, Ruan Q, Schwerd T, Hrdinka M, Maki JL, Saleh D, Suebsuwong C, Ray S, Brennan PE, Cuny GD et al. 2015. Inflammatory Signaling by NOD-RIPK2 Is Inhibited by Clinically Relevant Type II Kinase Inhibitors. Chem Biol, 22 (9), pp. 1174-1184. | Citations: 30 (Web of Science Lite) | Show Abstract | Read more

RIPK2 mediates pro-inflammatory signaling from the bacterial sensors NOD1 and NOD2, and is an emerging therapeutic target in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We observed that cellular RIPK2 can be potently inhibited by type II inhibitors that displace the kinase activation segment, whereas ATP-competitive type I inhibition was only poorly effective. The most potent RIPK2 inhibitors were the US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs ponatinib and regorafenib. Their mechanism of action was independent of NOD2 interaction and involved loss of downstream kinase activation as evidenced by lack of RIPK2 autophosphorylation. Notably, these molecules also blocked RIPK2 ubiquitination and, consequently, inflammatory nuclear factor κB signaling. In monocytes, the inhibitors selectively blocked NOD-dependent tumor necrosis factor production without affecting lipopolysaccharide-dependent pathways. We also determined the first crystal structure of RIPK2 bound to ponatinib, and identified an allosteric site for inhibitor development. These results highlight the potential for type II inhibitors to treat indications of RIPK2 activation as well as inflammation-associated cancers.

Total publications on this page: 10

Total citations for publications on this page: 127