Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Barrett’s oesophagus is a condition associated with gastric reflux that increases the chance of developing oesophageal cancer by 30-fold. A key question is how Barrett’s oesophagus arises from normal gastrointestinal tissue. However, because there are several different types of cells within Barrett’s oesophagus, research into the cellular origins of this tissue is difficult. To overcome this challenge, Ludwig Oxford’s Richard Owen, Michael White and David Severson from Xin Lu’s and Benjamin Schuster-Böckler’s labs performed single cell RNA sequencing on patient biopsies from Barrett’s and normal oesophagus. Their results, published in Nature Communications, show that a cell population in Barrett’s oesophagus had most similarity to normal oesophageal submucosal gland cells. This finding has implications for the clinical diagnosis of Barrett’s oesophagus.

 

Similar stories

Developing a system to simultaneously detect genetic and epigenetic information

Schuster-Böckler

Dr Benjamin Schuster-Böckler wins funding to develop algorithms that can identify both genetic variation and DNA methylation from the same sequencing data, with applications in biomedical research and detection of diseases such as cancer.

Drugging p53

Lu

The drug arsenic trioxide can restore the structure and function of some p53 tumour suppressor mutants, with potential as a future personalised cancer treatment strategy.